Under Virginia law, both of a child’s parents are required to support them financially. This means that when a court decides the custody of a child, the parent who receives physical custody and the noncustodial parent will both have to pay toward the well-being and needs of their offspring. Noncustodial parents are the ones who generally are bound to child support orders and agreements.

To this end, a noncustodial parent will probably have to pay child support. The Virginia guidelines require courts to look at the incomes of the child’s parents as well as the costs that are associated with raising a child in the community where the matter is being resolved. Based on those and other factors, a court will decide how much money a parent should have to pay to help take care of their child.

It is possible for a noncustodial parent to have little to no income. In situations where a parent does not have the capacity to pay, a court may order them to provide very little to their child. However, if a parent improves their financial position and begins to earn more money, a custodial parent may ask a court to modify their child’s support order to increase the payments that the noncustodial parent is required to provide.

To get the best possible advice on child support questions, readers are asked to speak directly with their family law legal representatives. This post does not provide any legal advice or guidance and is offered only as information to those who want to learn more about the financial obligations that attach when parents decide to end their relationships.